The Guardian’s ‘Scotland Stories’ Glimpses At Postwoman’s Life

Nearly a year ago the question of “Should Scotland be an independent country?” was in contention and would dismantle the 300-year political union formed with England. Though the Scottish independence referendum was still voted to reject making Scotland its own entity, over 1.6 million Scots voted to separate from the United Kingdom — a portion of the population that was highly reported on but captured best by The Guardian.

Photo credit by Murdo MacLeod/ The Guardian.
Photo credit by Murdo MacLeod/ The Guardian.

Amanda Murray is one subject of The Guardian’s nine-part “Scotland stories” series highlighting Murray’s job as a postwoman, a job that would change seals if Scotland was to change flags. The Guardian, a England-born news publication as old as the state of Louisiana and Old Ironsides, produced this series of audio slideshows seeking to depict the everyday-life citizen of Scotland, in this case in the Outer Hebrides.

Early morning scenes of the rolling Scottish hills and the drizzles at daybreak that make the hills so lush and green open the audio slideshow. Murray’s introduces herself in soft tone that welcomes the listener to follow her throughout her day — a technique The Guardian photographer Murdo MacLeod counts on to keep viewers engaged.

Most comment writers enjoyed MacLeod’s take at traditional photojournalism. Though, some like user ‘nationwide’ disagreed.

Contrary to ‘nationwide’s’ comment, that so-called “radio-with-pictures format” is what makes it so watchable. Following a similar style to broadcast television, her words are matched with a photo visually detailing her day. Her dialogue is matched with key natural sound such as rain, trucks and others about the daily commute.

MacLeod produced eight additional audio slideshows including: Christine Maciver, a sister at Bethesda hospice and care home; Jelina Berlow-Rahman, human rights lawyer; and Ani Yeshe Zangmo, a nun at the Kagyu Samye Ling Buddhist monastery

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s