Time’s photojournalism: Images of 2014

TIME compiled a photo story of the most iconic photos take by their photojournalists in 2014.

The photos were taken from around the world and across the U.S.

Dasha Jones, 19, is arrested during a protest before the  verdict was made against Darren Wilson, Nov. 20, 2014. Photo by Barrett Emke.
Dasha Jones, 19, is arrested during a protest before the verdict was made against Darren Wilson, Nov. 20, 2014. Photo by Barrett Emke.

Many of the photos depict the violence and unrest that took place around the world in 2014, from places such as Afghanistan, Brazil, Burma, Central African Republic, Finland, Gaza, Hong Kong, Iraq, Japan, Jordan, Mexico, the Philippines, Syria and Ukraine.

The photos although taken at different times  throughout the year, collectively tell a story of rebellion, refuge and of poverty stricken cities left in ruins.

A Qabaris neighborhood in the Old City area of Homs. Photo by Yuri Kozyrev.
A Qabaris neighborhood in the Old City area of Homs. Photo by Yuri Kozyrev.

There were some “lighter moments” in the photo story, such as photos taken by Alex Majoli on the set of Mad Men and Christopher Morris’ photos documenting the mid-tern elections.

The TIME’s arrangement of photos was powerful and direct. The photos were accompanied only by a small caption, which in this instance worked. The images were able to speak for themselves without having to rely on text to tell their story.

Some of the photos were in black and white, while others told their story though color, creating a powerful statement. The photo by Elinor Carucci of the close up of the premature baby and the wide shot of demonstrators protesting the shooting of Michael Brown, by Andrew Cutraro, both conveyed a powerful message through different camera angles.

Abdul Kadir, 65, suffers from a stomach ailment and malnutrition. Photo by James Nachtwey.
Abdul Kadir, 65, suffers from a stomach ailment and malnutrition. Photo by James Nachtwey.

These photos were power in their own right, but the setup of the website made it difficult to change from one photo to the next. The images were placed in a carrousel on the webpage, but it wouldn’t let you go back to the previous photo. Also, because the photos were in a carrousel I couldn’t copy a direct link to the individual photos. The links always brought me back to the homepage with the first photo.

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